Top Architectural Feats in Tallahassee

By Cristi McKee | Photo: St. Peter’s Anglican Cathedral

You may be surprised by how many unique, historic, and impressive architectural wonders can be found here in the capital. If you are curious about what these buildings are, check out this list of the top architectural feats in Tallahassee!

Caroline Brevard Grammar School

Caroline Brevard Grammar School – Also known as the Bloxham Building, this historic building was designed by William Augustus Edwards and represents classic Colonial Revival architecture. In 1987, it was registered with the U.S. National Register of Historic Places and is currently being utilized by a host of different offices. Photo: State Archives of Florida.

Lewis Spring House

Built in 1954 and designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, this historic house was actually built as a private residence per request by a friend of the architect himself. Designed in a pod-shaped and hemicycle style, it was designated a building on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Photo: Spring House Institute.

Women’s Club of Tallahassee

Often used as a wedding venue or meeting place, this historic building was built in 1927 and represents both Mediterranean Revival Style architecture and Colonial Revival architecture. The Women’s Club of Tallahassee was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1987. Photo: Women’s Club of Tallahassee.

St. Peter’s Anglican Cathedral

Constructed in 2013, the cathedral, designed by Bradley Touchstone, was inspired by typical ancient English gothic churches. With stained glass windows and a larger-than-life crucifix, St. Peter’s Anglican Cathedral, a 36,000-square-foot property, is an impressive edifice located on Thomasville Road. Photo: St. Peter’s Anglican Cathedral.

Leon High School

This high school is noted as the oldest high school in the state of Florida. Established in 1831, Leon High School was designed by M. Leo Elliott and actually became a school before Florida was designated an official state. This high school encompasses both Mission Revival Style architecture and Spanish Colonial Revival Style architecture. Photo: Leon County Schools.

Covington House

Often referred to as Schendel House, William Augustus Edwards designed this residence and it was built in 1927. Mimicking Renaissance architecture, this historic building was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1989. Photo: Public Domain.

Florida State Capitol Building

This building, sometimes called “The Old Capitol,” which was built in 1945, was previously the Florida capitol building before being converted into a museum when a new construction was built to house the capitol building. Built based on Neoclassicism and Classical Revival architecture, this historic building is found directly behind the new capitol building. Photo: Florida Historic Capitol Museum.

David S. Walker Library

Serving as the office building for Springtime Tallahassee, this historic building was previously called The University Library. Exhibiting characteristics of Neoclassicism and Classical Revival architecture, it no longer has any library function. In 1976, this edifice, which was named after Governor David S. Walker, was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Photo: State Archives of Florida.

Carnegie Library at FAMU

Also designed by William Augustus Edward, this historic building, which opened as one of Andrew Carnegie’s college libraries in 1975, is located on the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University campus. Built in 1908, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1978 and represents Classic Revival Style architecture. Photo: State Archives of Florida.

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